Cummins Inline 6 Driver

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INLINE 6 is a new Technology and Maintenance Council's RP1210 standard compliant diagnostic tool, which utilizes the latest electronic technology and delivers high performance and quality at the attractive price. Supports latest INSITE, PowerSpec and Calterm III programs and any other software applications that are fully compliant with the RP1210 standard. INLINE 6 can communicate with your PC. Coveted Inline-6 Diesel Engines. December 8, 2020. Mike McGlothlin. We spend a lot of time here at Driving Line celebrating the Cummins found in ’89 to present Dodge Rams, but in at least one corner of the world that I-6 diesel is considered child’s play. After all, long before engines like the 6BT revolutionized the diesel pickup. INLINE™ Data Link Adapters. To access information about INLINE Data Link Adapters, click here. These products can be purchased by contacting your local Cummins Distributor or visiting Store.cummins.com. Click here to locate your nearest Cummins Distributor. This is an emissions related article! Cummins INLINE 6 Data Link Adapter Truck Diagnostic Tool http://www.bowshine.com/truck-diagnostic-tool-c-100/cummins-inline-6-data-link-adapter-truck-diagnos. The eye-catching INLINE 6 breaks new ground by utilizing the latest electronic technology to deliver high performance and high quality at an attractive price. Each INLINE kit contains a data link adapter, basic cables, and the INLINE PC software driver.

Get INLINE 6 for 5 Reasons:

1. The INLINE 6 can communicate with your PC through a 9-pin serial connector. The INLINE 6 also can communicate with your PC over a Universal Serial Bus (USB) through a 4-pin standard connector. The INLINE 6 adapter connects to vehicle power, the SAE J1708/J1587 data link, and two CAN/J1939 data links via a 25-pin serial connector.


2. With full compliance to the Technology and Maintenance Council's RP1210 standard, the INLINE 6 will work with the latest for Cummins INSITE, PowerSpec and Calterm III software applications.

Cummins Inline 6 Driver


3. It will also work with any other software applications that are fully compliant with the RP1210 standard (note that while some non-for Cummins applications fully support RP1210, others do not, so you should test each application in question with the INLINE 6 adapter to make that determination).


4. The eye-catching INLINE 6 breaks new ground by utilizing the latest electronic technology to deliver high performance and high quality at an attractive price.


5. Each for Cummins INLINE kit contains a data link adapter, basic cables, and the INLINE PC software driver. Load the software driver, connect all the hardware, and you are ready to start a new era in data link adapters.

INLINE 6 Features:

1. Supports SAE J1708/J1587 and J1939/CAN data links

2. Both CAN ports auto detect between 250 & 500 kbps

3. Supports USB full speed port at up to 2M baud rate

4. Custom USB cable includes thumbscrews for secure mounting to INLINE 6

5. Supports RS-232 PC serial port at up to 115.2k baud rate

6. Is fully compliant with TMC's RP1210 standard

7. Small enough to fit in pocket

8. Attractive black powder coated aluminum housing provides ruggedness

9. Derives 8 V to 50 V DC power from vehicle

10. Controlled by advanced 140 MHz 32-bit Freescale processor for maximum speed and performance

Cummins Inline 6 Adapter Driver

11. Includes 6 LEDs to indicate status of power, USB, RS-232, J1708/J1587, and two CAN communication ports

12. Both CAN ports support SAE J1939, SAE J2534, and ISO 15765 protocols

13. INLINE 6 is certified to meet European CE requirements

14. Rated for -40° to +85° C operating temperature

Cummins Inline 6 Driver

15. INLINE 6 meets rigorous for Cummins in-cab environmental test requirements

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    • By fergy12 · Posted

      Sorry for reviving an old thread but does someone have the cylinder mass values of a good running engine? I’ve got a 6.7 right now threw fuel limit codes for 3 cylinders (5,7,8). did all the pinpoint test to no real conclusion, relative compression good, manual power balance has cylinders 4 and 6 slightly higher than the rest but those cylinders not tossing codes. No driveability issues. Did the TSB for clearing fuel values and crank position sensor. Vehicle returned to have injectors done, rechecked codes, now have codes for cylinder #2, #6 and #8. Cleared the fuel values again and 3 cylinders are up around that .03-.07grams range, the rest are in the -.03- -.06. No real evidence of metallic flakes in lower fuel housing. vehicle does have bully dog tuner, IQA all correct, dyed diesel (farm fuel) that the customer states they use additives in at all times, latest programming I removed tuner, updated pcm, reloaded tune last visit. im thinking the cylinder mass pids should be +-.05grams or less, more in the range of +-.03 as stated above but just curious as to what you guys are seeing. I tried to find another 6.7 to compare and unfortunately don’t have one at the moment. Thanks.
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      Mike you are probably right on that - PROFIT if the number one factor in all of these decisions. If the engine option was selling well we would likely not be having this discussion.
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      .....and hence why Ford decided to pull the plug on it. The low take rate, I personally think is the biggest contributor to the decision. The biggest mistake they made in its release, is only offering it on high trim level trucks, making an already expensive truck even more expensive with the added cost of this engine option.
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      I haven't even driven one. With all of the people that were clamoring for Ford to put a diesel into the F150 you would think they would have sold a lot more.
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